Ethics: To Pray In Jesus Name Or Not?

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What would you do Wednesday!

Consider being in a situation similar to that of Pastor Baity when he was recently fired for praying in Jesus name. Baity got to say one prayer before the N.C. House, but then he was not invited back. He is protesting his firing and the N.C. House prayer guidelines are being looked into.

The situation to consider: You are invited to pray at an official government meeting such as your state House of Representatives. The authorities recently heard about the incident with Pastor Baity. They do not want a repeat. They want all religions to feel welcome and believe that simply praying to “god” is satisfactory. The official order given to you is the following-

The prayer should not be in Jesus name. It should not mention Jesus. If this order is violated not only will you not be invited back to pray, but no Christians will be invited to pray at this assembly again.

What do you do? How do you pray?

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The above article was posted on July 14, 2010 by Mark Lamprecht.
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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Rick Beckman July 14, 2010 at 11:27 am

“In Jesus’ name” is an attitude, not a closing phrase. Even the “amen” is optional. “Father, forgive them” is just as valid as “Dear Jesus, thank you for this meal. In Jesus’ name. Amen.”

So what do you do? You pray humbly, knowing that the restrictions placed upon you are no real restrictions if your heart is in the right place.

2 Doc B July 14, 2010 at 11:44 am

I would inform the head of the organization that I don’t pray to ‘an unknown God\’; and that if this is a problem, they would need to find someone else to pray.

It sounds like they already have ‘no Christians’ praying at the assembly to start with, so the threat is hollow. It is also blatant religious discrimination, but if it isn’t a government entity, it isn’t a constitutional issue.

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